Posts Tagged ‘Maintenance’

An Effective and Modern Tool in Construction and Maintenance

April 8th, 2021

Reduce delays and eliminate damage to underground pipes and utilities. Using a high-pressure air or water, you can break up soil, clay and other malleable earth elements, and remove waste with a powerful vacuum unit.

Non-destructive Digging: The Importance

The ground beneath the Earth’s surface contains a complex web of cables, pipes, drains, gas lines and tree roots. This means that any mechanical excavation has the potential to cause costly damage. This type of digging technology allows excavation onto and around underground assets without the risk of causing damage. It uses high-pressure air or water to dig the hole, and a specially designed nozzle to vacuum the debris into a holding tank.

This fast and efficient system reduces the risks of disruption or delays to your project and keeps site cleaning easier. Its use to identify, locate or prove underground assets provides peace of mind, and can significantly reduce operating costs and the risks associated with damaging existing buried assets. Gaining access to underground assets is simpler and safer with this innovative digging technology.

As a non-mechanical excavating method, it is a safe and more convenient alternative to hand digging. Communications industry, construction, and utility companies accept it as the best practice to safely exposing any buried facility. It minimizes the risks associated with excavation work such as possible loss of service, explosions from gas mains, shorting of electrical cables, and damage to water pipes. It is more efficient than manual excavation, and reduces injuries and minimizes worker insurance claims.

The Benefits of the Technology

Through the years, the technology has proved its worth in road, bridge, and general construction and maintenance projects. Here are some of the many benefits it offers.

- Reduces the risk of damage and disruption to subterranean assets
- It gives you peace of mind knowing that your digging work doesn’t damage subterranean assets such as telecommunications, water and sewer pipes, and gas lines.
- Reduce remediation and operating costs
- Footpaths, roads, and guttering can remain virtually unaffected.
- It reduces the harmful impact on the environment. Traditional digging methods often damage surrounding areas and tree roots. Non-destructive digging is much gentler on the environment.
- Increases productivity, which means reduced time on the job and more money in your pocket
- It is safe, reliable and versatile.
- Considered to be the most sustainable way to excavate and has the least damaging impact to the environment

NDD increases productivity and efficiency, whilst saving substantial time on the digging process. The technique of NDD reduces liability on all involved parties and increases the levels of safety on excavation and construction sites.

There Are Special Regulations for the Construction and Maintenance of Hospital Ventilation

February 8th, 2021

The hospital facilities manager could be seen as part of its healthcare team, even though he or she is not directly involved in medical treatment, because the role includes maintaining high standards of hygiene and efficiency in the building’s ventilation systems.

It is well known that ventilation systems accumulate dust, which is a mixture of organic compounds containing a high proportion of skin and hair, both valuable nutrients for the growth of micro-organisms that can then easily become airborne. The UK’s Department of Health has a set of guidelines specially for the construction and maintenance of ducted air systems, called Health Technical Memorandum 03-01.

The transmission of airborne infection is a crucial issue for hospitals, where patients are particularly vulnerable to infection. Maintaining good air In the introduction is the statement that increased health risks to patients will occur if ventilation systems do not achieve and maintain the required standards and that the link between surgical site infection and theatre air quality has been well established.

MRSA is known to be able to survive on surfaces or skin scales for up to 80 days and spores of Clostridium difficile may last even longer. So while they may not directly transmit from person to person through the air, any skin particles that collect as dust in ducting systems and other hard to clean places could potentially be a risk to patients.

Tuberculosis (TB; Mycobacterium tuberculosis), on the other hand, is transmitted in the air and can be a source of outbreak in hospitals.

It is known that ductwork systems gather dust which is a mixture of organic compounds containing a high proportion of skin and hair, both valuable nutrients for the growth of micro-organisms that can then easily become airborne

The UK’s Department of Health has a set of guidelines specially for the construction and maintenance of ducted air systems, called Health Technical Memorandum 03-01.

In the first part is a list of specifications for the construction of air duct systems in hospitals, but it may not be either practical or affordable for an existing hospital to replace an existing air duct system and the memorandum’s second part lays down specific rules for their inspection and maintenance to ensure.

The first part contains a list of specifications for the construction of air duct systems in hospitals, but it may not be either practical or affordable for an existing hospital to replace an existing air duct system and the second part of the memorandum lays down specific rules for their inspection and maintenance to ensure ventilation hygiene.

It says that all ventilation systems should be have at least a simple visual inspection annually to ensure that it conforms to the minimum standards and that its general condition is fit for its purpose and operating effectively.

Hopsital hygiene is about more than making sure that that surfaces are regularly cleaned and that staff, visitors and patients should wash their hands frequently to prevent the spread of potentially-dangerous infections like MRSA.

Arguably, therefore the hospital facilities manager plays an essential role in ensuring the health and safety of patients while in hospital and their recovery from illness as quickly as possible because it is part of their role to ensure that the air quality standards are kept as high as possible.

MRSA can survive on surfaces or skin scales for up to 80 days and spores of Clostridium difficile may last even longer.

A regular schedule of inspection, ventilation cleaning and filter maintenance is, therefore, an essential part of patient care and best carried out by a specialist cleaning contractor fully conversant with all the latest rules and regulations specific to hospital ventilation systems.

Copyright (c) 2011 Alison Withers